NY Penal Law § 160.15: Robbery in the first degree

by ECL Writer
Robbery In The Third Degree

Robbery In New York is a serious crime that involves taking another person’s property through the use of force or the threat of force. In the state of New York, robbery is classified into different degrees based on the severity of the offense. One of the most serious forms of robbery is first-degree robbery, which is defined under NY Penal Law § 160.15. This offense carries severe penalties and can result in long-term imprisonment. Understanding what constitutes first-degree robbery, its penalties, and its defenses is essential for anyone facing charges or interested in the criminal justice system. This Eastcoastlaws.com article provides an overview of NY Penal Law § 160.15: Robbery in the first degree, including its definition, elements, penalties, and defenses.

Definition And Elements Of Robbery In The First Degree In New York

When you are charged with robbery, you are accused of not just stealing but also of committing the offense while employing force or the threat of force. Robbery is regarded as a particularly serious crime by law enforcement due to the additional element of force or violence. Although there are three different levels of robbery, the first degree is the most severe. According to New York Penal Law 160.15, you will be charged with this crime if you steal from someone while carrying a deadly weapon, using a dangerous device, inflicting substantial physical harm on the victim or another person, or showing a gun.

According to New York Penal Law 10.00(12), “a dangerous weapon” is any loaded weapon, including a gun, a knife, a dagger, a billy knife, a blackjack knife, plastic or metal knuckles, a gravity knife, a pilum ballistic knife, a metal knuckle knife, and a switchblade knife. According to New York Penal Law 10.00(13), a “dangerous instrument” is any device, item, or substance that has the potential to result in death or significant physical harm. Whether or whether something is deemed to be a dangerous instrument depends less on what it is and more on how the defendant utilizes it.

New York Penal Code § 160.15: Robbery in the first degree

Robbery in the first degree is when someone steals anything by force and, during the crime’s commission or immediate escape from it, they or another participant in the crime:

  • Causes serious physical injury to any person who is not a participant in the crime; or
  • Is armed with a deadly weapon; or
  • Uses or threatens the immediate use of a dangerous instrument; or
  • Displays what appears to be a pistol, revolver, rifle, shotgun, machine gun, or other firearms; except that in any prosecution under this subdivision, it is an affirmative defense that such pistol, revolver, rifle, shotgun, machine gun, or other firearm was not a loaded weapon from which a shot, readily capable of producing death or other serious physical injuries, could be discharged. Nothing contained in this subdivision shall constitute a defense to a prosecution for, or preclude a conviction of, robbery in the second degree, robbery in the third degree, or any other crime.

Penalties For Robbery In The First Degree In New York

The maximum jail term for first-degree robbery, which is a class B felony, is typically 25 years. Yet the judge will base your punishment on things like your prior criminal history and aggravating or mitigating circumstances surrounding the robbery. Because first-degree assault is also regarded as a severe felony, the judge must still sentence you to at least 5 years in jail even if you have no past convictions. If you are judged to be a non-violent predicate criminal, the court must sentence you to at least 8 years in prison; but, if you are judged to be a violent predicate offender, you must serve at least 10 years.

Defenses For Robbery In The First Degree In New York

You may be able to use the fact that you did not brandish a lethal weapon or other dangerous objects as a defense against a first-degree robbery prosecution. The definitions of a lethal weapon and a dangerous device under the law are highly detailed. The prosecutor could find it challenging to persuade the jury that the weapon was lethal or dangerous if, for instance, you threatened the victim with a non-serrated, dull-edged knife or another seemingly harmless utility knife. Even if you don’t actually carry a lethal weapon, you could still face charges if you give the victim the impression that you have.

Examples Of Robbery In The First Degree Cases In New York

Brenda was outside an apartment complex when Logan came up to her and demanded that she give him all of her money. Logan threatened to shoot Brenda if she didn’t give him her money right away while he had his hand in his pocket. Brenda noticed a large thing in Logan’s pocket that she thought was a gun based on its appearance. Brenda took her wallet out and gave Logan $62. Logan departed the area. Logan might be charged with first-degree robbery. He gave Brenda the impression that he had a firearm in his pocket even though he didn’t show it to her.

Comparison Of Robbery In The First Degree With Other Types Of Robbery Offenses In New York

Robbery is a serious crime in New York, and the state has different degrees of robbery offenses, each with its own elements and penalties. In addition to first-degree robbery, which is the most serious form of robbery, there are also second-degree robbery and third-degree robbery offenses in New York.

Second-degree robbery is defined under NY Penal Law § 160.10, and it involves the use of force or threat of force to steal property or prevent someone from resisting a theft. This offense is less severe than first-degree robbery, but it still carries significant penalties.

Third-degree robbery is defined under NY Penal Law § 160.05, and it involves the use of force or threat of force to steal property from someone. This offense is the least severe form of robbery in New York, and it carries lesser penalties than the first and second-degree robbery offenses.

When comparing first-degree robbery with other types of robbery offenses in New York, there are several differences to consider. First-degree robbery is the most serious form of robbery, and it involves using a deadly weapon or causing serious physical injury to the victim. This offense carries the most severe penalties, including a mandatory minimum sentence of ten years in prison.

Second-degree robbery involves the use of force or threat of force, but it does not require the use of a deadly weapon or cause serious physical injury to the victim. This offense carries a prison sentence of up to 15 years.

Third-degree robbery is the least severe form of robbery, and it only involves the use of force or threat of force to steal property. This offense carries a prison sentence of up to 7 years.

In conclusion, the severity of the robbery offense in New York depends on the level of force used, the presence of a deadly weapon, and the extent of physical injury to the victim. Understanding the differences between these offenses is essential for anyone facing robbery charges or interested in the criminal justice system.

Leave a Comment

This blog is ONLY for informational or educational purposes and DOES NOT substitute professional legal advise. We take no responsibility or credit for what you do with this info.