Are Assault And Battery A Felony In NY?

by ECL Writer
Felony Assault in New York

Assault and battery are serious offenses that can result in severe physical harm to victims. In New York, these crimes are taken very seriously, and the penalties can be severe. If you have been charged with assault or battery in New York, it is important to understand the severity of the charges and the potential consequences. This Eastcoastlaws.com article will provide an overview of assault and battery laws in New York, including the differences between the two offenses, the types of charges that can be brought, and the potential penalties. Whether you are facing charges or simply want to better understand the legal system, this article will provide valuable information about assault and battery in New York.

Defining “Assault” in New York Criminal Law

Assault is defined in New York criminal law as intentionally causing or attempting to cause physical injury to another person. The offense of assault can also include acts that result in the physical injury of another person, even if there was no intent to cause harm. Additionally, threats or actions that cause a person to reasonably fear that they are about to be physically injured can also be considered assault under New York law.

New York criminal law categorizes assault into three degrees of severity, with first-degree assault being the most severe and third-degree assault being the least severe. The severity of the offense is determined by factors such as the severity of the injury inflicted and whether a weapon was used in the commission of the assault.

Assault can be charged as either a misdemeanor or a felony in New York, depending on the specific circumstances of the offense. If convicted of assault, an individual can face significant penalties, including fines and imprisonment. It is important to understand the legal definition of assault in New York, as well as the potential consequences of a conviction, in order to protect one’s legal rights and mount an effective defense if charged with the offense.

There is No Crime of “Battery” in New York

Unlike many other states in the US, there is no specific crime of “battery” under New York law. Instead, the offense of battery is typically encompassed within the offense of assault. Specifically, New York criminal law defines assault as intentionally or recklessly causing physical injury to another person or attempting to do so. This definition includes the intentional use of force against another person, which is often considered battery in other states.

Civil battery occurs when an individual is touched in an offensive manner. The battery could refer to an allegation that the defendant attacked the plaintiff (punching, kicking, choking, etc.) and caused physical harm, or that the defendant engaged in another non-consensual physical touching that did not cause physical injury.

Are Assault And Battery A Felony In NY?

Assault and battery are both serious crimes that can result in significant harm to the victim. In New York, these offenses are treated seriously and can result in severe penalties for those convicted. Whether an assault or battery is charged as a felony in New York depends on the specific circumstances of the offense.

Assault in New York can be charged in varying degrees of severity, with the most serious being first-degree assault. This offense is classified as a Class B felony and carries a potential sentence of up to 25 years in prison. First-degree assault involves causing serious physical injury to another person with a deadly weapon or dangerous instrument, or intentionally disfiguring or destroying a part of the victim’s body.

Second-degree assault is another serious offense that can be charged as a felony in New York. This offense is classified as a Class D felony and carries a potential sentence of up to seven years in prison. Second-degree assault involves intentionally causing physical injury to another person with a deadly weapon or dangerous instrument, or intentionally causing serious physical injury to another person.

Third-degree assault, the least severe form of assault in New York, is classified as a Class A misdemeanor. This offense carries a potential sentence of up to one year in jail. Third-degree assault involves intentionally or recklessly causing physical injury to another person, or negligently causing physical injury to another person with a weapon.

Unlike assault, there is no specific offense of “battery” in New York criminal law. Instead, the act of battery is generally encompassed within the offense of assault. In other words, if an individual intentionally or recklessly causes physical injury to another person, they may be charged with assault, regardless of whether they used a weapon or not.

In conclusion, assault and battery can be charged as felonies in New York, depending on the specific circumstances of the offense. The severity of the charge will depend on factors such as the level of harm inflicted, the use of a weapon, and the victim’s age and occupation. It is important for individuals facing criminal charges in New York to understand the legal definitions of assault and battery, as well as the potential penalties for a conviction, in order to mount an effective defense. Consulting with an experienced criminal defense attorney can help individuals facing criminal charges to better understand their legal options and build a strong defense strategy.

Does Someone Have To Be Physically Injured In Order For Assault Charges To Be Brought?

For there to be a true assault charge, there must be evidence of serious harm; it cannot simply be a case of someone getting smacked in the face and feeling some temporary discomfort. Because there is no actual significant injury or substantial discomfort involved, this would not be considered assault; rather, harassment, a less serious accusation, would apply. Many times, especially in domestic abuse cases, the victim will initially file an assault complaint because they believe they were physically assaulted.

The charge is decreased to attempted assault because there is no serious injury and it turns out that they never visited the hospital or suffered any severe injuries that could have been verified. It is significant to highlight that charges of attempted assault in any degree can be brought even when no actual injury is claimed, leading to lengthy prison terms without any harm.

Defense Strategy for Assault And Battery In New York

If you have been charged with assault and battery in New York, it is important to take the charges seriously and to mount a strong defense strategy. The following are some key steps that can be taken to defend against assault and battery charges in New York:

  • Challenge the evidence: One common defense strategy is to challenge the evidence presented by the prosecution. This can involve questioning the credibility of witnesses, highlighting inconsistencies in the evidence, and challenging the methods used to collect and analyze evidence.
  • Assert self-defense: If you acted in self-defense, this can be a strong defense against assault and battery charges. However, in order to successfully assert self-defense, you must be able to demonstrate that you had a reasonable belief that you were in danger and that your use of force was necessary to protect yourself.
  • Assert defense of others: If you were acting to protect someone else from harm, you may be able to assert the defense of others as a defense strategy.
  • Assert mistaken identity: If there is reason to believe that you were misidentified as the perpetrator of the assault and battery, this can be a strong defense strategy.
  • Negotiate a plea bargain: Depending on the specific circumstances of the case, it may be possible to negotiate a plea bargain that results in reduced charges or penalties.

In any case, it is important to work with an experienced criminal defense attorney to build a strong defense strategy that takes into account the specific details of your case. By mounting an effective defense, it may be possible to avoid a conviction or to secure a reduced sentence.

Leave a Comment

This blog is ONLY for informational or educational purposes and DOES NOT substitute professional legal advise. We take no responsibility or credit for what you do with this info.