Good Cause Eviction New York – All You Need To Know

by ECL Writer
Tenant Rights To Break Rental Lease In Washington D.C.

In New York, a new law has been implemented that has the potential to drastically impact both tenants and landlords alike. This law called the Good Cause Eviction Law in New York provides tenants with increased protection from eviction and limits landlords’ abilities to terminate tenancies without just cause. The law is designed to provide a fair and just process for both tenants and landlords, but it has sparked debate among housing advocates, landlords, and lawmakers alike. In this article, Eastcoastlaws.com will explore the Good Cause Eviction Law in New York, what it means for tenants and landlords, and the controversies surrounding it.

What Is Good Cause Eviction

Good Cause Eviction is a type of eviction protection law that provides tenants with increased protection from eviction and limits landlords’ ability to terminate tenancies without just cause. The Good Cause Eviction Law was recently implemented in New York and is designed to provide a fair and just process for both tenants and landlords.

Under the Good Cause Eviction Law New York, landlords can only evict tenants for a specified list of reasons, which are considered just cause. These reasons include non-payment of rent, violating lease terms, creating a nuisance or hazard, or engaging in criminal activity on the property. Additionally, landlords can evict tenants if they need to make major repairs to the property or if they intend to use the property for their own personal use.

The Good Cause Eviction Law also provides tenants with increased protection from retaliatory evictions, which occur when landlords try to evict tenants in response to tenants asserting their legal rights. The law prohibits landlords from evicting tenants for exercising their legal rights, such as complaining about unsafe living conditions or joining a tenants’ union.

Overall, the Good Cause Eviction Law aims to protect tenants from arbitrary and unjust evictions while also providing landlords with a clear set of guidelines for terminating tenancies. By doing so, it promotes stable and secure housing for tenants while ensuring that landlords can still maintain their properties and make necessary repairs.

It’s important to note that the Good Cause Eviction Law applies to most rental properties in New York, including both rent-stabilized and market-rate apartments. However, there are some exceptions, such as owner-occupied buildings with four or fewer units.

What is the NY good cause eviction Bill?

A good cause eviction is a law that restricts evictions to individuals with legitimate reasons, as the name implies. Democratic Senator Julia Salazar of the 18th District sponsored S2892B, a bill that directly addresses New York’s lack of regulations regarding rent increases without justification and leases renewal denials. Although the law has had difficulty passing thus far, it is still a crucial issue that frequently comes up in New York policy conversations. Although it is hoped that no family or renter will be evicted without justification, this is not the case in practice. As Good Cause Eviction would restrict when a home can be evicted and limit most decisions to a court order, it would protect too many households from unfair evictions at a landlord’s whim. A judge will oversee the decision in court to ensure that the conviction was properly upheld.

Good Reason Eviction also covers refusal of lease renewals in addition to mid-lease evictions. Hence, if a tenant requests a one-year lease renewal but the landlord refuses, Good Reason Eviction would require a good reason for the refusal. If the parties were unable to come to an agreement, the landlord was unable to evict the tenants without first going through the legal system.

Rent arrears, occupiers making a nuisance of themselves for the benefit of landlords or neighbors, or occupants engaging in criminal activity are all issues that can be encompassed by the term “good cause.”

Who Would Good Cause Evictions Help?

Good Cause Eviction laws New York are designed to help tenants by providing them with increased protection from eviction and limiting landlords’ abilities to terminate tenancies without just cause. These laws aim to create a more stable and secure rental market, particularly for low-income and vulnerable tenants who may be at a higher risk of eviction.

Good Cause Eviction laws can help tenants in several ways. Firstly, they provide tenants with a clear set of guidelines for what constitutes just cause for eviction. This means that landlords cannot evict tenants arbitrarily or without a good reason, such as failing to pay rent or violating lease terms. This can help protect tenants from retaliatory evictions and ensure that they have a fair chance to maintain their housing.

Good Cause Eviction laws can also help protect tenants from displacement due to gentrification or other economic pressures. In areas where property values are increasing, landlords may be tempted to evict tenants in order to raise rents or sell the property. Good Cause Eviction laws can help prevent this by requiring landlords to have a valid reason for terminating a tenancy, such as needing to make major repairs or use the property for their own personal use.

Overall, Good Cause Eviction laws are intended to provide a fair and just process for both tenants and landlords, while also promoting stable and secure housing for tenants. They can help protect vulnerable tenants from arbitrary or unjust evictions, promote housing stability, and ensure that landlords are able to maintain their properties while still respecting tenants’ rights.

What Are Landlords Saying?

The implementation of Good Cause Eviction laws has been met with mixed reactions from landlords. Some landlords argue that these laws infringe on their property rights and limit their ability to manage their own properties. They may argue that the restrictions on eviction can make it difficult to deal with problem tenants or to respond to changing market conditions.

Opponents of Good Cause Eviction laws also argue that they can create a disincentive for landlords to invest in their properties. If landlords feel that they cannot control who is living in their buildings or that they may be stuck with problem tenants, they may be less likely to invest in repairs or improvements that would benefit tenants. This could lead to a decline in the quality of rental housing and may make it more difficult for tenants to find suitable housing.

However, proponents of Good Cause Eviction laws argue that they are necessary to protect tenants’ rights and to promote stable and secure housing. They point out that the restrictions on eviction can help prevent arbitrary or retaliatory evictions, which can be particularly harmful to low-income and vulnerable tenants. They also argue that Good Cause Eviction laws can help promote responsible property management by encouraging landlords to work with tenants to resolve problems rather than resorting to eviction.

Potential Drawbacks of Good Cause Evictions

Realtors, landlords, and other industry experts have all been outspoken in their opposition to the plan. The main worry is that if evictions need judicial clearance, landlords won’t have much control over their own business transactions.

Real estate professionals are concerned that if tenants lack the ability to make their own judgments, it could lead to extreme financial hardship, expensive court appearances to approve a decision, and the stress of a protracted, toxic relationship with a tenant. Additionally, if a case went to court, the tenants would have the right to remain in the home while the case took additional months to resolve, leaving the landlord defenseless and exposed to further financial risk. Good Reason Evictions opponents also claim that small to mid-level investors would be the group most harmed by the legislation. A local businessman with one property in their portfolio may not be as negatively impacted by the requirements of Good Cause Eviction as an out-of-town real estate tycoon with millions of dollars worth of properties scattered around the nation.

The eviction bill’s ultimate usefulness is unknown, and there is concern that it may hurt landlords more than it may benefit tenants. That begs the question of whether a potentially modest margin of relief for tenants is worth landlords being in a powerless predicament. Because of this, some opponents of the law suggest conducting additional studies to support the suggested merits of the legislation so that the results may be compared to the drawbacks.

In a series of public comments on the bill’s New York State Senate page, the public can openly comment on their opinion, many of which strongly caution against the bill. One mortgage company owner said, “This bill would put the brakes on multifamily investment in NY for the foreseeable future.… You will be hurting business owners like myself, realtors renting these apartments, contractors renovating these apartments, building material [manufacturers] and eventually companies looking to bring more businesses and employees to NY. Where will their employees live? This bill has a catchy name but it is downright cruel.”

Pros and Cons of Good Cause Eviction

There are two perspectives on good cause eviction, as we have shown. Below is a list of the benefits and drawbacks of this type of tenant protection, albeit more research and information are required on both sides.

Pros of Good Cause EvictionCons of Good Cause Eviction
-Predictable rent for tenants, allowing them to stay in place

-More stable communities

-More stable job market within communities

-Less discriminatory practices
-Fewer rental buildings would be built-

Fewer rental buildings would be renovated

-Less tax revenue and jobs within communities

-Higher property taxes

What You Need To Know

Good Cause Eviction is a complex issue, and the specific laws and regulations surrounding it can vary from city to city and state to state. If you are a landlord or a renter in a city or state with Good Cause Eviction laws in place, it’s important to understand your rights and obligations around the eviction process.

As a landlord, you should be familiar with the specific requirements for terminating a tenancy under the Good Cause Eviction laws in your area. This may include providing proper notice and documentation to tenants and demonstrating a valid reason for eviction, such as non-payment of rent or a breach of lease terms. You should also be prepared to work with tenants to resolve problems or disputes before resorting to eviction.

As a renter, you should be aware of your rights under Good Cause Eviction laws, including your right to receive notice and an opportunity to respond to eviction proceedings. You should also be familiar with the valid reasons for eviction under the law and be prepared to defend yourself against unjust evictions.

Overall, Good Cause Eviction laws aim to create a more fair and just rental market for both landlords and tenants. By understanding your rights and obligations around the eviction process, you can help ensure that these laws are being applied in a responsible and effective manner.

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