How To File For Full Custody In New York

by ECL Writer
What Does Full Custody Mean In New York

Regarding child custody disputes, emotions can run high, and the legal process can be overwhelming. If you are a parent in New York seeking full custody of your child, it is essential to understand the legal steps involved and the factors that can affect the outcome of your case. Filing for full custody in New York involves specific procedures and requirements that can vary depending on your individual circumstances. This Eastcoastlaws.com article will provide an overview of how to file for full custody in New York and offer tips on how to navigate the system effectively. By understanding the legal process and seeking the guidance of a qualified attorney, you can work towards securing the best possible outcome for you and your child.

Definition of Full Custody

Full custody, also known as sole custody, is a legal arrangement where one parent has primary physical and legal custody of a child. In New York, full custody grants a parent the exclusive right to make major decisions about the child’s upbringing, including matters such as education, healthcare, and religion. The other parent may still have visitation rights or parenting time, but they do not have a say in the major decisions affecting the child’s life. Full custody is typically awarded when it is in the child’s best interests, and the court determines that the other parent is unfit or incapable of providing a safe and stable environment for the child.

Types Of Custody Arrangements In New York

In New York State, there are four types of custody arrangements that may be awarded to parents during a divorce or separation:

  • Sole Legal Custody: This means that one parent has the exclusive right to make major decisions regarding the child’s upbringing, such as education, healthcare, and religion.
  • Joint Legal Custody: In this arrangement, both parents share the responsibility for making major decisions about the child’s upbringing, and must work together to reach agreements.
  • Sole Physical Custody: This means that one parent has the right to have the child reside with them for the majority of the time, while the other parent may have visitation rights.
  • Joint Physical Custody: In this arrangement, both parents share physical custody of the child, meaning the child spends significant time with both parents, and each parent has a designated schedule for when the child will reside with them.

It’s important to note that custody arrangements can be tailored to the specific needs of each family, and may be modified in the future if circumstances change. Additionally, New York courts prioritize the best interests of the child when making custody determinations.

Steps for Standalone Filing for Child Custody in New York

Determine what court and type of case

Standalone custody cases go through family court, while parents’ custody orders in a divorce go through the Supreme Court in New York. Parties must determine their court and type of case before filing for custody.

Complete all forms

All forms should be typed and double-spaced or printed legibly in black ink.

One must complete General Form-17 to petition for custody or visitation for the first time. One may attach a proposed parenting plan.

Finalize paperwork and turn in paperwork

Parties should make two additional copies of all their paperwork then take their complaints and other types of affidavits to a notary. Next, parties should take their documents to the family court clerk.

Serve the other parent or guardian

The filing parent must serve the parent or guardian currently with custody of the child with the motion to custody. The server should complete an Affidavit of Service, sign it in front of a notary, and file it with the court, which will serve as proof that the other party received notice of the case.

Serving papers is the last step of filing. Both parties will receive a summons via mail stating when and where to report for their appearance in court.

Court Hearing

The following steps in the court process are an appearance, conference, or a settlement filing, depending on how the court processes the case.

Factors to Consider Before Filing for Full Custody

If you are considering filing for full custody of your child in New York, there are several factors you should consider. These include:

  • Your relationship with the other parent: The court will consider your relationship with the other parent when deciding custody. If you have a good relationship and are able to work together, joint custody may be the best option. However, if there are issues such as abuse, neglect, or a history of domestic violence, full custody may be appropriate.
  • The child’s relationship with each parent: The court will also consider the child’s relationship with each parent. If the child has a strong bond with both parents and both are actively involved in their life, joint custody may be the best option. However, if the child has a stronger bond with one parent or one parent has been the primary caregiver, full custody may be appropriate.
  • The child’s preferences: If the child is old enough to express their preferences, the court will take them into consideration. However, the child’s preferences will not be the sole factor in the court’s decision.
  • The parent’s ability to provide for the child: The court will consider each parent’s ability to provide for the child’s basic needs, such as food, shelter, and clothing, as well as their ability to provide for the child’s emotional and educational needs.
  • The parents’ work schedules: The court will consider each parent’s work schedule and how it will impact their ability to care for the child. If one parent works long hours or travels frequently, full custody may be appropriate.
  • The child’s medical needs: If the child has special medical needs, the court will consider which parent is better able to meet those needs.
  • The parents’ ability to communicate and co-parent: The court will consider the parents’ ability to communicate and work together in making decisions about the child’s upbringing. If there is a history of conflict or an inability to work together, full custody may be appropriate.

It’s important to note that every custody case is unique, and the court will consider all relevant factors when making a decision.

Frequently Asked Questions About Full Custody In New York

What is full custody in New York?

Full custody, also known as sole custody, means that one parent has both legal and physical custody of a child. This means that the custodial parent has the legal right to make all major decisions for the child, including decisions about their education, medical care, and religious upbringing. The custodial parent also has the right to have the child live with them and to make day-to-day decisions about the child’s care.

How is full custody determined in New York?

In New York, custody decisions are made based on what is in the best interest of the child. This means that the court will consider a variety of factors when making a custody determination, including:

  • The child’s age, health, and emotional and developmental needs
  • The parents’ ability to provide for the child’s needs, including their ability to provide a stable home environment
  • The child’s relationship with each parent
  • The parents’ ability to cooperate and communicate with each other in matters related to the child
  • Any history of domestic violence or abuse by either parent

If the court determines that full custody is in the best interest of the child, then it may be awarded to one parent.

Can a parent lose full custody in New York?

Yes, a parent can lose full custody in New York if there is a significant change in circumstances that affects the best interests of the child. For example, if the custodial parent becomes unable to provide for the child’s needs, such as if they develop a substance abuse problem, then the non-custodial parent may be able to petition the court for a change in custody.

Can a parent with full custody move out of state with the child?

If a parent with full custody wants to move out of state with the child, they will need to get permission from the non-custodial parent or the court. If the non-custodial parent agrees to the move, then the custodial parent can submit a request to the court for approval of the relocation. If the non-custodial parent does not agree to the move, then the custodial parent will need to file a petition with the court and show that the move is in the best interest of the child.

What rights does a non-custodial parent have in New York?

A non-custodial parent in New York has the right to:

  • Have regular and meaningful visitation with the child
  • Receive information about the child’s education, health, and welfare
  • Be notified of any major decisions affecting the child, such as a change in school or medical treatment
  • Participate in major decisions affecting the child if the custody order allows for joint legal custody
  • Petition the court for a change in custody if there is a significant change in circumstances affecting the best interests of the child

Can a non-custodial parent be denied visitation rights in New York?

In rare cases, a non-custodial parent may be denied visitation rights in New York if the court determines that visitation would be harmful to the child. This may be the case if there is a history of domestic violence or abuse, or if the non-custodial parent has a substance abuse problem that affects their ability to provide for the child’s needs.

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