Is Forgery A Felony In New York

by ECL Writer
Criminal Possession Of A Forged Instrument Frequently Asked Questions

Forgery is considered a serious crime in New York State. In fact, it is a felony offense that can result in a range of penalties, including hefty fines and imprisonment. Forgery is the act of falsely creating or altering a written instrument with the intent to defraud someone.

Under New York State law, forgery is defined as intentionally and unlawfully making or altering a written instrument with the intent to defraud, deceive, or injure another person. A written instrument can be any document or record that has legal significance, such as a check, contract, or deed.

The penalties for forgery in New York depend on the severity of the crime. Forgery in the third degree, which involves the intent to defraud, deceive, or injure someone, is considered a class A misdemeanor, punishable by up to one year in jail and a fine of up to $1,000. Forgery in the second degree, which involves the intent to defraud, deceive, or injure someone and the use of a false instrument, is considered a class D felony, punishable by up to seven years in prison and a fine of up to $5,000. Forgery in the first degree, which involves the intent to defraud, deceive, or injure someone and the use of a false instrument in a business transaction or as part of an ongoing scheme, is considered a class C felony, punishable by up to 15 years in prison and a fine of up to $15,000.

It is important to note that forgery can also lead to civil liability. For example, if a person forges a signature on a contract, they may be held liable for any damages that result from the forged contract. This could include paying damages to the other party or facing legal action from law enforcement.

In addition to forgery, there are several other related offenses that are considered serious crimes in New York State. These include criminal possession of a forged instrument, criminal possession of a forged instrument in the second degree, and criminal possession of a forged instrument in the first degree. These offenses involve possessing or using a forged instrument with the intent to defraud someone.

Forgery is a felony offense in New York State that can result in serious penalties, including fines and imprisonment. It is important to understand the legal definition of forgery and related offenses to avoid unintentional violations of the law. If you have been charged with forgery or a related offense, it is important to seek legal counsel to protect your rights and interests.

What Is The Statute Of Limitation For Forgery In New York?

Depending on how serious the offense is, forgery in New York State has different statutes of limitations. The statute of limitations generally establishes a temporal restriction on how long a person may be held accountable for a crime. The accused cannot be charged with the offense once the statute of limitations has passed.

The statute of limitations for forgery in the third degree, a minor charge, is two years from the date of the offense. This means that the accused cannot be charged with forgery in the third degree if more than two years have passed after the alleged offense.

The statute of limitations for forgery in the second degree and forgery in the first degree, both felonies, is five years from the date of the offense. Thus, the accused cannot be charged with forgery in the first or second degree if more than five years have passed since the alleged offense.

It is significant to remember that the statute of limitations may, under certain conditions, be tolled or extended. The statute of limitations might be suspended until the accused returns, for instance, if they leave the state. Similarly to this, the statute of limitations may be extended if the accused is incarcerated or otherwise unable to be found.

In any case, it’s crucial to get legal representation as quickly as you can if you’ve been charged with forging in New York State. You can learn more about your legal rights and options from a seasoned criminal defense lawyer, who will also fight to uphold your interests throughout the court proceedings.

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