New York Grand Larceny By Credit Card

by ECL Writer
New York Grand Larceny Frequently Asked Questions

Grand larceny is one of the numerous theft-related criminal crimes recognized by New York criminal law. In order to deprive another individual of their property, larceny is described as taking, gaining, or withholding that person’s property. New York Penal Statute 155.05. If you take nearly any kind of property, such as real or personal property, money, computer data, computer programs, gas, steam, water, or electricity, you could be charged with larceny. NY Penal Code Section 155.00 (1). Moreover, you may be charged with larceny if you take someone else’s credit or debit card, or their credit or debit card number.

Over the past 20 years, there has been a marked increase in credit card theft. Credit and debit card numbers are now stolen from people’s computers and the internet, in addition to being stolen from handbags, wallets, and pockets. Contact a New York Grand Larceny by Credit Card Lawyer right away if you’ve been charged with credit card theft or any other kind of theft. Your attorney will go through your legal options with you and help you navigate the judicial system.

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Related Topic – NEW YORK GRAND LARCENY IN THE FOURTH DEGREE

Several larceny charges, such as petit larceny and grand larceny, are defined in the New York Criminal Code. In addition, there are several grand larceny charges that vary in severity according to the nature and amount of the stolen goods. Grand larceny in the fourth degree, a Class E felony, is the charge you will face if you are suspected of taking someone else’s debit or credit card. New York Penal Statute 155.30. If found guilty, you might spend up to four years in prison. NY Penal Code Section 70.00.

There are numerous ways to steal credit card information. Credit cards are typically stolen by stealing a pocketbook or “pickpocketing” a wallet. Credit cards may occasionally be taken “accidentally,” which means the accused had no intention of stealing a credit card. But, having the intent to take a credit card or debit card is not necessary in order to be charged with grand larceny in the fourth degree for the theft of one of these cards. All you needed was the desire to take someone else’s property.

For instance, if you steal a $50 backpack and it turns out that it also has a wallet with a MasterCard and a Visa, you will be charged with grand larceny in the fourth degree rather than petit larceny, which carries a maximum jail sentence of one year.

People have developed more sophisticated methods to steal credit cards in recent years. Currently, it’s common for secure computer systems to be hacked in order to acquire credit card information, frequently in bulk. Hence, physical card theft is not required in order to be charged with grand larceny by credit card. It is sufficient to steal a credit card number.

Additionally, if you use a computer to take someone’s credit card, you might also be charged with computer fraud. If you use a stolen credit card to buy goods or services, you may also be charged with further grand larceny, which, depending on the cost of the items you bought, may result in a sentence of more than 4 years in jail.

It’s critical to get legal counsel as soon as you’ve been charged with a theft-related white-collar felony. There is a lot on the line when you are accused of a crime since a conviction will result in a criminal record that will follow you for the rest of your life.

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