New York Grand Larceny From The Person

by ECL Writer
New York Grand Larceny Frequently Asked Questions

Theft is a crime that can be committed in a variety of ways. If you want to steal anything from someone, you can break into their house or automobile, use the internet, or take it straight from them. Pickpocketing, as it’s often known, can involve stealing straight from someone. The New York Criminal Code makes it clear that pickpocketing is a serious felony, despite the fact that it may look like a minor violation. Pickpocketing is actually a type of major larceny. New York Penal Statute 155.30. That is a felony, so if you are found guilty, you run the risk of spending a lot of time in jail. As a result, if you have been accused of grand larceny by the person, take the accusation seriously and get in touch with a New York Grand Larceny from the Person’s Lawyer right away. They will give you advice and support throughout the entire criminal procedure.

Larceny is a sort of theft that involves taking something from its owner with the intention of permanently robbing them of it. New York Penal Statute 155.05. Almost anything of value, including cash or other personal property, can be considered “property” for the purposes of larceny offenses. Grand larceny and petty larceny are the two main categories of larceny in New York. A misdemeanor crime known as “petit larceny” is simply described as stealing someone else’s possessions. New York Penal Code 155.25. Grand larceny, on the other hand, is a crime. The value of the property involved is the primary distinction between petit and grand larceny in terms of the law.

Related Topic – NEW YORK GRAND LARCENY IN THE FIRST DEGREE

Related Topic – NEW YORK GRAND LARCENY IN THE SECOND DEGREE

Related Topic – NEW YORK GRAND LARCENY IN THE THIRD DEGREE

Related Topic – NEW YORK GRAND LARCENY IN THE FOURTH DEGREE

If the value of the stolen property is small, a charge of petit larceny will normally be brought. Nonetheless, there are several circumstances in which the theft of a low-value object will result in a large larceny charge rather than a petit larceny prosecution. One consideration would be whether the victim was directly targeted during the theft. For instance, if you take $25 worth of stuff from someone’s person, you can face felony charges rather than misdemeanor ones. Even if there is no actual violence or injury, the law treats crimes involving such close proximity to another person that there is a high risk of violence or injury very seriously.

Because of this, theft from a person while engaging in larceny will at the very least result in a charge of grand larceny in the fourth degree, a Class E felony. New York Penal Statute 155.30. If found guilty, you might spend up to four years in prison. NY Penal Code Section 70.00. If the value of the property taken is greater than $3,000, the charge could be upgraded to grand larceny in the third degree. New York Penal Statute 155.35. Grand larceny in the second degree will be charged if the amount surpasses $50,000. N.Y. Pen. Law § 155.40. It does not matter that you did not know the value of the item that you took.

A wallet or other item being taken from someone’s pocket is not the only definition of grand larceny in the fourth degree. It refers to robbing someone outright of their property. Hence, you may also be charged with grand larceny from the person if you steal their handbag, purse, backpack, or briefcase. Additionally, the victim need not have been immediately aware of the offense in order to be charged with fourth-degree larceny. In reality, most pickpocket victims are unaware that something has been taken from them until long after the crime has already been committed.

If you have been charged with grand larceny from the individual, for example, you may risk years in jail if you have been suspected of stealing. It is crucial to get experienced advice because your future is on the line.

Leave a Comment

This blog is ONLY for informational or educational purposes and DOES NOT substitute professional legal advise. We take no responsibility or credit for what you do with this info.