Termination For Not Paying Rent In New York And Other Rent Rules

by ECL Writer
Termination For Not Paying Rent In New York

New York Termination for Nonpayment of Rent is a legal process where a landlord can terminate a tenancy agreement due to the tenant’s failure to pay rent. This process is governed by New York state laws and it is important for both landlords and tenants to understand their rights and obligations. The termination process typically involves a series of steps, including a notice to the tenant and a court hearing, before the eviction can take place. It is advisable to seek legal guidance if either the landlord or the tenant is unsure of the process. In this post, Eastcoastlaws.com will outline all you need to know about Termination for not paying rent in New York with other renting rules.

New York Rules on Late Fees

New York state law regulates the number of late fees that landlords can charge tenants for failing to pay rent on time. Late fees are charges that are imposed by landlords as a way to encourage tenants to pay rent on time and as compensation for any inconvenience caused by the late payment. However, it is important to note that late fees should not be used as a way to generate profit for the landlord.

Under New York state law, landlords are allowed to charge a reasonable late fee for rent payments that are received after the due date. The late fee should not be more than 5% of the rent due for that month or $50, whichever is less. For example, if the monthly rent is $1,000, the maximum late fee that the landlord can charge is $50. If the monthly rent is $600, the maximum late fee that the landlord can charge is $30.

It is important to note that the late fee should be a reasonable amount that reflects the actual costs and inconvenience caused by the late rent payment. For example, if the landlord has to spend time and resources to process the late payment, they may be able to charge a reasonable fee to cover these costs. However, if the late fee is significantly higher than the actual costs incurred by the landlord, it may be deemed unreasonable and unenforceable.

Landlords must also follow specific rules when it comes to charging late fees. For example, they must provide written notice to the tenant that explains the amount of the late fee, the date it will be charged, and the reason for the charge. The notice must also include a statement that the late fee is in addition to any other amounts owed by the tenant. In addition, landlords must include the late fee policy in the lease agreement, so that tenants are aware of the late fee policy before they sign the lease.

It is also important to note that late fees cannot be used as a form of retaliation against tenants. For example, if a tenant has a legitimate reason for being late with the rent, such as a medical emergency, the landlord cannot charge a late fee. In addition, late fees cannot be charged in a discriminatory manner, such as charging higher fees to certain tenants based on their race, gender, religion, or other protected status.

Amount of Notice New York Landlords Must Give Tenants to Increase Rent

As of July 2019, New York instituted clear guidelines as to how landlords may increase rent for rent increases of 5% over existing rent:.

  • Tenants occupying for a year or having a lease of at least one year: 30 days’ notice.
  • Tenants occupying from one to two years and leaseholders of one to two-year leases: 60 days’ notice.
  • Tenants occupying more than two years or having leases of two years or more: 90 days’ notice.

Remember that if you have a long-term lease, the landlord cannot raise the rent until the current tenancy expires and a new one starts unless the lease expressly permits an increase. (N.Y. Real Prop. Law §226-c.) For rental properties subject to rent control or rent stabilization, other restrictions typically apply.

Rent Increases as Retaliation or Discrimination

Rent increases as retaliation or discrimination are illegal under federal and state fair housing laws. It is against the law for a landlord to increase a tenant’s rent as a form of retaliation or discrimination.

Retaliation occurs when a landlord takes an adverse action, such as increasing rent, against a tenant for exercising their legal rights. For example, if a tenant complains about a violation of their lease agreement or a housing code violation, and the landlord responds by increasing their rent, this would be considered retaliation.

Discrimination occurs when a landlord treats a tenant differently based on protected characteristics, such as race, color, national origin, religion, sex, familial status, or disability. For example, if a landlord increases the rent of a tenant who is a member of a protected class, while not increasing the rent of other tenants who are not members of that class, this would be considered discrimination.

Both retaliation and discrimination are illegal under the Fair Housing Act and similar state laws. If a tenant believes that their rent increase is the result of retaliation or discrimination, they have the right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) or a similar state agency.

It is important for tenants to keep documentation of their complaints and any communication with their landlord, as this can be used as evidence in a fair housing complaint. If the complaint is found to be valid, the tenant may be entitled to compensation for damages, including the amount of the unjustified rent increase.

New York State Laws on Termination for Nonpayment of Rent

New York state law provides a process for landlords to terminate a tenancy agreement due to the tenant’s failure to pay rent. This process is known as Termination for Nonpayment of Rent. Under New York law, landlords must provide the tenant with a written notice before terminating the tenancy agreement. The notice must specify the amount of rent that is owed, the date by which the rent must be paid, and the consequences of failing to pay the rent, which may include eviction. The notice must also give the tenant the opportunity to pay the rent within a specific timeframe, typically three to five days.

If the tenant fails to pay the rent within the specified timeframe, the landlord can proceed with the termination process. This typically involves filing a notice of petition with the court and serving the tenant with a notice of petition and a summons. The notice of petition informs the tenant of the landlord’s intention to seek eviction and the summons requires the tenant to appear in court.

At the court hearing, the landlord must prove that the tenant failed to pay the rent and that the landlord followed the proper legal procedures. If the court finds in favor of the landlord, the judge may issue a warrant of eviction, which authorizes the sheriff to remove the tenant from the rental property.

Rent Control and Rent Stabilization in New York

Rent control and rent stabilization are two forms of rent regulation in New York state that aim to ensure that tenants are protected against excessive rent increases and to preserve the availability of affordable rental housing.

Rent control is a form of rent regulation that applies to rental units in buildings constructed before February 1, 1947, in cities with a population of over 300,000, such as New York City. Rent control sets the maximum rent that a landlord can charge for a rental unit, which is determined by the local rent control board. Rent control also restricts a landlord’s ability to evict a tenant and requires that they have a valid reason, such as nonpayment of rent, to do so.

Rent stabilization is a form of rent regulation that applies to rental units in buildings with six or more units constructed between February 1, 1947, and December 31, 1973, and to some units in newer buildings that receive certain tax benefits. Rent stabilization sets limits on the amount by which a landlord can increase the rent each year, which is determined by the New York State Division of Housing and Community Renewal (DHCR). Rent stabilization also provides tenants with protections against eviction and requires that landlords have a valid reason, such as nonpayment of rent, to evict a tenant.

Both rent control and rent stabilization are governed by the New York State Emergency Tenant Protection Act and the New York City Rent and Eviction Regulations. Landlords who violate rent control or rent stabilization regulations may face penalties, including fines and the loss of their ability to increase the rent or evict a tenant.

New York rent stabilization and rent control regulations are usually very complex and change often, so check with the following agencies to see if your rental unit is covered and the exact rules that apply:

Another useful resource for New York tenants is TenantNet.

New York Guide to Tenant Rights

For an overview of tenant rights when it comes to paying rent under New York landlord-tenant law, see https://ag.ny.gov/consumer-frauds/housing-issues.

How long does it take to get evicted for not paying rent in NYC?

The time frame for getting evicted for not paying rent in New York City can vary depending on the circumstances, but it typically 3 to 6 months. Once a landlord has provided the tenant with a written notice for nonpayment of rent, the tenant typically has three to five days to pay the rent or contest the eviction. If the tenant does not pay the rent or contest the eviction, the landlord can proceed with filing a notice of petition with the court and serving the tenant with a notice of petition and a summons.

Once the tenant has been served with the notice of petition and summons, they must appear in court on the scheduled date. If the court finds in favor of the landlord, the judge may issue a warrant of eviction. It typically takes several days to several weeks for the sheriff to physically remove the tenant from the rental property.

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